Posts tagged Forbes
Consider These 11 Tips to Better Recruit Senior-Level Employees

“To recruit effectively at the senior level, all decision-makers must share a vision of the ideal candidate. Companies often miss the mark on this critical aspect. Consider “best case” experience, personality traits, motivating factors, etc. Hone the picture until everyone is in agreement about whom they want to attract. This enables the hiring team to find (and ultimately hire) that ideal person.” ~ Jackie Ducci, Ducci & Associates

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Maggie KennedyForbes
Defeat Self-Doubt With These Nine Simple Techniques

A few simple words of encouragement from a friend or colleague can go a long way. I keep a file of complimentary hand-written notes and emails that I’ve received over the years. On a tough day, I find it helpful to turn to that file. Remembering the people I’ve helped over the years and the kind things they’ve said always leaves me feeling recharged. — Jackie Ducci, Ducci & Associates

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Jackie DucciForbes
12 Late-Stage Interview Faux Pas That Could Cost You The Job

Candidates often believe that playing it cool will make them more attractive to employers. In reality, it is a terrible strategy. Interview processes are long and arduous. Hiring managers want a quick and enthusiastic "yes" from their top candidate once they have reached the final stage. But when an offer is met with indifference (think comments such as, "I need a few days to think it over" and/or "I have other offers on the table"), it is a massive turnoff. From the employer's perspective, extending a job offer is kind of like proposing marriage. Imagine being down on one knee, presenting a ring, only to be told by the potential spouse that they can't accept right away because they have other suitors out there and they need to think about it. It sounds silly, but it's true. - Jackie DucciDucci & Associates

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Jackie DucciForbes
Think Your Employee Is Looking For A New Job? Here's What To Do

Ask yourself how valuable the employee is. Would their departure have a major impact? How senior is their position? If the employee is worth fighting for, initiate an honest conversation. Perhaps the relationship can be salvaged. Conversely, if the person can be easily replaced, best to do nothing. Let them leave. No company needs an employee on their team who does not genuinely want to be there. - Jackie DucciDucci & Associates

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Jackie DucciForbes